How to save the life of a marketer

Save the life of a marketer? From what?

There’s only one thing that’s very dangerous for any marketer — a bad product.

In recent years, with the rising of social media marketing and viral marketing, brands start to create “persona” to attract customers. Paid ads, loud and aggressive marketing interrupt everyone’s feed. It doesn’t matter what you are reading or watching. The “personas” are dry and fake; the ads invades people’s private sphere — their phone or laptop screens.

The customer as “fish in the sea” — bad product was built from the wrong basis. Even if the best marketing was used for such product, it’s going to be not only a waste of resources, but it’s also morally questionable for marketers to persuade people to pay for such a product — a product the marketers themselves don’t have faith in.

If we are ought to change the marketing, we need to save talented marketers from bad products that don’t serve anyone, that don’t solve any problem.

If you are a marketer but you are working on a bad product’s campaign, don’t despair. Listen to your customers and understand what they really need. If you can, help with the design of this product to make it better.

Or quit and find a better product to market for.

These are the two ways to save your life.

The secret to surviving the new market place that you might have overlooked

“The customer is always right.” Well, that time has passed.

What was true before as the golden role of customer service now seems to be over simplified and one-dimensional.

Today’s relationship between a product/service provider and the customer has changed very much from a few years ago.

The product and service itself is still important. Yet there are something else rises up to the center of the customer’s attention — customer experience.

The multi-dimensional experience.

From the moment of encounter to getting-to-know phase, from buying process to user experience and customer support, the complete experience of a customer decides whether the product and service is successful or not.

We’ve entered a new era of B2C business. Anyone who ignore the customer experience will be eliminated from the transforming market place.

Remember, the complete experience matters equally.

More time and more money? Pay attention to this

Guess what it is.

Grand goal? Endurance? Persistence?

They are all important… but there’s something that are in front of our eyes the whole time, but we sometimes choose not to see them.

When we talk about our work, our encounters with our clients and partners, what always seem invisible but crucial?

You have your goals set, plans made, ideas validated and you have started working on achieving them.

You encounter roadblocks and you overcome them; you have problems and you solve them.

You generate new ideas despite it’s difficult and frustrating as hell.

Still, something still so small are still causing troubles. They are everywhere and they really frustrate us.

Because if we fail to see them, we’ve got to redo our work, and the setback can mean days, weeks, or worse.

They are called “details”.

No matter whether you think you are a “big picture” person or an executioner, a dreamer or a producer, you are a fool if you say that you don’t need to care about the details.

Even for trials, details are significant indicators to whether something might work or not. Every designer should know that.

Some details might really don’t matter that much. But the ability to pay attention to detail is a must have. Because you don’t know which one detail is more important than others when you are in the flow of creating.

Time is the most valuable currency. Lacking of attention to details turns out to be extremely costly.

So if you want to be productive and rich, you know I’m right.

Creative juices not flowing? No time to create? Try doing this first

Not having enough time and not having the right idea are the two big roadblocks for the creatives.

As someone working in the creative fields, we expect ideas coming and hitting us in the head. The working process is like water flowing from the faucet. 

“Just do it.” They say.¬†

But nobody tells us how. Like it’s all going to happen by some magical power. No intention of yourself. No decision to be made.

“It’s not in my hand,” the artist says, “God put it in my head and He holds my hand.”

It’s a nice picture. But it’s also just not how most of the creators and artists work.

We think we don’t need time solely designated for creative work. Because when it’s time, the process is going to carry out by itself.

We think we don’t need to make decisions to prioritise. Because of course the creative process has the priority — when its the time for it.

But if we, as the creators, don’t intentionally make the decision to prioritise the work, we won’t be able to have the time we need to produce, to deliver the work.

To prioritise means intentionally to do something first, to give it more attention and time.

It’s a decision to be made.

Making such decisions is actively taking responsibility in our creative lives. Even if we are the receiver of Godly creations of arts, this is the only thing that we shouldn’t stop doing.

Prioritise so that you have the time for the space so that ideas can come to you as they will.

The secret to success – what “Better Call Saul” teaches solopreneurs

I’ve been watching “Better Call Saul”. Currently at the beginning of season 3.

Jimmy Mcgill is the odd piece that doesn’t fit anywhere in a law firm.

Doing bits to rip people off in bars and the streets for many years, he entered law with an already established value system – he doesn’t play by the rules. When he’s “being himself”, people who are traditional lawyers who hold things seriously and the law sacred dislike, even despise him. Considering he’s capable to be a good lawyer, this value system makes him perfect for flying solo – starting with entrepreneurship. 

But what he has that is considered “useless” among the serious lawyers – showmanship – is what makes him successful as a solo practitioner of the law. 

When someone is good with people, she understands what other people feel. She knows what they want and what they desire. She knows what they need.

That’s why she can say the right thing to get other people’s attention and trust.

She will get their business.

But don’t ever forget, if the ability to empathize and “showmanship” is all she’s got, it’s not enough.

Saying the right thing and doing a good show can only get her this far.

Only when she’s able to DO the right thing and DO it well and KEEP DOING it, can she keep these people’s business. 

Jimmy Mcgill has the work done. And he got it done well. 

Again and again. 

That’s why the elderly love him. If it’s not Jim’s own change of business direction, I don’t think his clients going anywhere.

(Well, I will keep watching. Of course, his business clientele changed… as we all know…

Don’t tell me what happens next…)

I’m learning so much from Jimmy’s experience so far.

Empathy, showmanship, real ability to do good work, AND good customer service are equally important for entrepreneurship — especially for solopreneurs.